Review: Bad Apple




A threat to remain silent or she ends up like the kittens silences Neal Marchal for eight years. She's an orphan, connected to her stepmother's family, with no close kin to protect her. It's a life full of secrets, of a hidden dream involving music, and a group of people who are the only family she has, even if they are different … hurtful.

The intervention of a cop with a good heart after a neighbor is murder gives Neal hope, but she still holds back. Everyone knows the mountain people of apple country in New York don't abide by the same rules as other folks. Yet, these differences threaten to destroy Neal, until she meets a guy with a band, and an offer.

Barbara Morgenroth weaves a tale of a family steeped with "bad apples," and a teenager surviving by her wits and her dreams. Neal's plight mirrors the plight of so many children, so many families, and yet she finds ways to escape – through writing and eventually music. It's a testament to the strength of the human spirit as Neal journeys from terrified, hide away teen to a confident singer and a person willing to accept help from others. This is a story that will appeal to teens who have experienced hardship and survived. I highly recommend this book.



"You tell and next time you won't even be able to crawl away."

Neal Marchal lived with this threat for the next eight years. When she finds her neighbor murdered, she knows who did it. The why is the secret the family has been keeping forever. The reminder to never reveal the secret is her limp.

She rebuilt her life and now Neal has everything to live for--music, performing and a growing affection for the young man who pulled her to safety.

Then Joe comes home. Neal knows Joe's going to finish what he started 8 years ago because she told. But this time Neal vows the outcome will be different.

 
 

Barbara was born in New York City and but now lives somewhere else.  Starting her career by writing tweens and YA books, she wound up in television writing soap operas for some years.  Barbara then wrote a couple cookbooks and a nonfiction book on knitting.  She returned to fiction and wrote romantic comedies.
When digital publishing became a possibility, Barbara leaped at the opportunity and has never looked back.  In addition to the 15 traditionally published books she wrote, in digital format Barbara has something to appeal to almost every reader from Mature YAs like the Bad Apple series and the Flash series, to contemporary romances like Love in the Air published by Amazon/Montlake, and Unspeakably Desirable, Nothing Serious and Almost Breathing.
 
 
 
 
 




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