Teen Mysteries – Then & Now



Teen mysteries have been around for many years. Who can forget Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys? These books written by many authors under the pseudonyms of Carolyn Keene and Franklin Dixon have entertained teens since the forties. Then there are the Trixie Belden books.

These stories all had a common core. Teens solving mysteries with a dedicated group of friends.  Modern teen mysteries have teens involved in a lot more than those of old, but they have a common thread. Teens solving mysteries with some adults offering advice or help in the background. Today’s teens are more sophisticated and many think their books should reflect that modern world.

The mysteries of yesteryear depended on going to the scene of the crime and eliciting as much information as a young person could from those in charge. There were always those who would snicker behind their backs or send them in the wrong direction, in order to prove these teens weren’t worthy of the job. Instead of relying on modern technology, those investigators had to depend on their wits and deductive reasoning.

Imagine if you will how much easier it is to solve a mystery using an iPhone and the plethora of apps offered on one of these devices. Where is the fun in seeking out answers inside dusty old houses or creepy graveyards? If an app is giving your teen the answers they need, what impetuous do they have to bother investigating?

The best mystery are those where teens don’t have to look at a phone to uncover the location of a “crime.” Rather than inputting an address into GPS, imagine the side roads they’ll take in their zeal to get to the root of the problem.

Remember this when writing a mystery for teens… the more your young detective has to work to solve the mystery, the more interesting their outcome will be.

About the K.C. Sprayberry

Born and raised in Southern California’s Los Angeles basin, K.C. Sprayberry spent years traveling the United States and Europe while in the Air Force before settling in northwest Georgia. A new empty nester with her husband of more than twenty years, she spends her days figuring out new ways to torment her characters and coming up with innovative tales from the South and beyond. 



She’s a multi-genre author who comes up with ideas from the strangest sources. Those who know her best will tell you that nothing is safe or sacred when she is observing real life. In fact, she considers any situation she witnesses as fair game when plotting a new story.

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