Action Based Sci-Fi









It seems an oxymoron to say action based and sci-fi in the same sentence. Most of my experience with science fiction tales has been very action based. I’m a real sucker for a great space battle. In teen sci-fi novels, the author is faced with a conundrum. How scientific to you get? How much action and adventure should be involved? How much trouble should your characters get into?






Venus Rising falls into the typical science-fiction story. The setting is an underwater research lab. There are scientists and administrators. Families live in this moveable sphere. Oh, and there’s Mick, who did something extraordinary as a small child and is on the station pretty much against his will. He’ll do just about anything to get away from Venus, the station, even though the AI computer wants him to hang around. 








Venus—a research habitat in the North Atlantic—learned to communicate with a very special young man long before humans inhabited her decks. Eleven years later, sixteen-year-old Mick Beaumont has long given up on his friend inside the computer. He’s determined to leave what he sees as a loser lifestyle and return to terra firma.

On the day of the scheduled rising, nothing happens as it should. Mick’s at a loss to explain the breakdowns, despite being the prime suspect. Determined to figure out the mystery, he enlists the aid of his girlfriend and best bud, only to have one betray him at a crucial moment.

The fate of the world is in this young man’s hands. Can he stop the eco-terrorists and bring Venus to the surface before planetary annihilation happens?





Pain. Excruciating, unbearable pain drove through her joints and caused her to groan. For a very long time, Venus lay still. She tried to absorb why the miniscule humans who inhabited her wanted to hurt her. What had she done wrong? Why did they want her to remain on the bottom of the ocean? When would this pain end?

She had to do something. Now. Before the other humans suffered. But the men called Julian Marcus and Chief Swenson wouldn’t allow her to notify the right people. Some way—there must be a method she could use to let the scientists know of the problem. How could she contact Dr. Michael and Dr. Katrina?

Blocked. Those men wanted this information kept from them! Why? No sense. Didn’t show good judgment for humans to remain below when they needed to do repairs. Dr. Michael. Dr. Katrina. Must know. Can’t get to them.



About the K.C. Sprayberry

Born and raised in Southern California’s Los Angeles basin, K.C. Sprayberry spent years traveling the United States and Europe while in the Air Force before settling in northwest Georgia. A new empty nester with her husband of more than twenty years, she spends her days figuring out new ways to torment her characters and coming up with innovative tales from the South and beyond.

She’s a multi-genre author who comes up with ideas from the strangest sources. Those who know her best will tell you that nothing is safe or sacred when she is observing real life. In fact, she considers any situation she witnesses as fair game when plotting a new story.

Social Media Links

















Comments