Arrogance






Authors have many enemies. We tread carefully around reviewers. Our editors are adored and given soft handling. Your cover artist is never screamed at. The reader scares the life out of us. Yet, far too many authors have developed an arrogant when dealing with these people and others involved in the pre-publication process.

As an author, I’ve often found myself frustrated with parts of the process to ready my book for publication. Editing seems to be going too slow. The cover artist just doesn’t understand the elements of my thoughts. Oh, those readers. They just plain terrify me. The urge to let the ego rage and become a diva is difficult to avoid.

Yes, you heard right. The calm and professional author has an ego and it’s at diva level. Why now? I’ve worked hard to produce my books. I have a vision when I start each one and work many long hours every single day of the week in order to follow that vision.

Yet, no one on any social media site will point to evidence of my diva side. I’m gracious, saying thank you when someone tells me I’ve done a good job. I appear to be someone totally in control of my writing career.

A few other authors, however, appear to be bent on a path of destruction. Their book becomes a Best Seller and they’re bringing in great royalties, until they hit a bump in the road…

A reviewer trashes their book. The author notices an immediate decrease in sales and promptly goes to social media to attack the offender, who must be the reviewer.

What’s the outcome?

The author’s friends immediately commiserate with the injustice done to their famous pal. They share this individual’s name and call them a hack, an individual who can’t write a book so they take out their anger on the poor author.

This information is shared widely and get back to the reviewer, who has noticed a cooling down of review requests. Said reviewer changes his/her policies and immediately sets up an agreement with all authors they agree to review—if your review is three stars or less, we’ll tell you about it but we’re not posting anything online. The reviewer is protecting themselves. As well they should.

Only, now the author’s name is turning into mud. Authors all over the web are turning to him or her, demanding to know what got into them. You never, ever trash a reviewer’s name in public. If you have something to say to the person, you email them.

The same goes with your editor, publisher, even your cover artist. When it comes to problems you see, store your arrogance in a suitcase and approach in a friendly manner. Despite any outcome you don’t like, remain professional.

After all, you are a professional. Professional’s aren’t arrogant bullies. They learn to suck up the hard parts of their job and move on.



About the K.C. Sprayberry

Born and raised in Southern California’s Los Angeles basin, K.C. Sprayberry spent years traveling the United States and Europe while in the Air Force before settling in northwest Georgia. A new empty nester with her husband of more than twenty years, she spends her days figuring out new ways to torment her characters and coming up with innovative tales from the South and beyond.

She’s a multi-genre author who comes up with ideas from the strangest sources. Those who know her best will tell you that nothing is safe or sacred when she is observing real life. In fact, she considers any situation she witnesses as fair game when plotting a new story.

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Comments

Martin Kloess said…
Very important. (I feel)